Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

You can continue to place orders via phone, email or online. We are still shipping from some locations. Thank you for understanding.

For more information see our Coronavirus (COVID-19) protocol.

866-328-5018   Mon-Fri 8:30 - 4:30 EST

Free Quote: Email | 866-328-5018 (M-F 8:30-4:30 EST)

Call: 866-328-5018 | Free Quote

 

The Fence Post

Goat Fencing

September 30, 2019 | by Joe Morrell

The Right FenceAdult and baby goat in pen

4" x 4"

Barnyard or backyard, goats may be a source of comic relief or the creators of mayhem. So much depends on the enclosure you provide for your herd. Goats interact with fencing and will test its limits. Your herd of goats will find a fence's vulnerability and capitalize on it for their own exploring and ravenous ends. 

To begin with, a 4 foot high high tensile woven wire fence with 4" x 4" openings is the rule. Goats are strong and smart and your fence has to be as well. Tough and flexible woven 12.5 gauge wire with strong stiff stay knots is imperative. This combination of factors will stand up to the roughhousing that goats bring to the party.

Let's break down some of those terms--

  • Woven Wire--A woven wire fence's linked yet loose structure allows for a large amount of bend, twist and pull without breaking -- a perfect design if you have livestock to contain.This makes for secure mesh, strong enough to hold together well when impacted by a demanding goat. This also adapts to variable terrain.                                                                                                                                                                           
  • 12.5 Gauge--a thickness of wire with a minimum of 1,350 pounds breaking strength, which you'll find plenty strong for your goats.                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • High Tensile--means higher carbon steel wire, roughly twice the strength of low carbon wire yet lighter due to the higher grade of steel, the payoff being easier handling. Safer than barbed wire for your goats and can be electrified. Standard Class 3 galvanizing protects the wire and extends its life. With proper maintenance it can last up to 40 years.                                                                                                                                     
  • 4" x 4" Openings--goats can't get their heads and horns through, avoiding injury. It's smooth wire; again, reducing injuries.
                                                                                               
  • S knot, (also known as Square Deal): This knot is used insquare deal fence knot making non-climb 4" x 4" mesh sheep and goat fence. The S knot prevents the fence from buckling or sagging. It also provides extra vertical strength and rigidity while at the same time allowing flexibility. These knots add to the fence's adaptability to hilly terrain. One-piece vertical stay wires, attached to line wires--with a crimp--prevent slippage. 

Outsmarting your Goat

Add an extra strand of electric fence wire at the top of the fence to ensure safety, especially for more ambitious goats. Yet, no matter what system is in place when keeping goats: vigilance is required. A break or defect in the fence and your goat will take advantage of it, resulting in runaway goats. Straying goats will munch a rose bush over a clump of grass. When goats are limited to a grassy enclosure, the incidence of worms and parasites goes up. They are known as browsers in their style of feeding--leafy fodder above the ground is of particular interest and they will use a fence to find ways to get at bushy shrubs and the lower growth of trees--or happily climb trees. If you've got a goat that makes a practice of finding new and creative ways of escaping, it may be time to enhance your enclosure for Ms. or Mr. Gruff, upgrading your existing fence. A rebellious goat will readily tutor other goats in your herd with its pillaging tactics.

Look at this goat's ingenuity!

 

If you're desiring a backyard goat, remember that cities and towns may have size and number limits. Consider your neighbors as they can be noisy. You must have space--you cannot share your yard with a goat as your yard won't exist after a goat has its way. As omnivorous as they seem they will not eat what they've peed on so their fodder must be kept off the ground in a raised feeder. 

a black and a white goat in gated entry

Shedding and Fence Stress

Seems to be that shedding is going to be one of the stressors on your fence. Shedding? Yes, this is why a woven wire fence comes in handy; it flexes with the strains of a goat using it to rub off its warm winter undercoat that comes off in spring. You might give your goats a good brushing to prevent wear and tear on your fence. 

Goat Facts:

  • First and foremost--goats are social animals and being isolated is stressful for them.
  • They walk immediately after being born and are weaned around 3 months.
  • Birth occurs in spring, after 5-6 months gestation, producing 1 or 2 kids.
  • A male goat is known as a billy or a buck; if castrated, they are called wethers.
  • Females are does or nannies. They are generally ready to breed once they have reached 80 lbs.
  • Lifespan of domesticated goat: generally 12-18 years and varies with the breed.

GOAT FENCE

 

Read More

Topics: goat, woven wire, high tensile wire, 12.5 gauge

Restraining Lava Loiterers

July 12, 2018 | by Joe Morrell

lava flow in barren rock

Protecting people from lava flows and from themselves.

There are some fencing products on their way to Hawaii. It seems some physical barriers are required to offset the lava-play aficionados and looky-loos that are putting themselves at peril. For us at home, observing the mesmerizing lava flows from your screen of choice is a popular pastime, quite understandably. However, far from these screens is the tough job of predicting the actions of people who are curious or foolhardy enough to want to get close to the volcanic activity. Louis Page has been called in to assist with the fence and mesh needed to curb these adventurous and possibly harebrained scofflaws. Remember that vinyl coated high tensile wire is the fence of choice for longevity and strength.  

Over-reacting? Nope. 

The dangers are numerous:

  • Those fascinating sea water explosions of boiling water and steam require onlookers to be at least a 1/4 of a mile away for safety. That steam is not just water vapor! 
  • Methane gas is created when vegetation is inundated without oxygen, exploding up to 100 yards ahead of the lava flow.
  • The flows emit fumes that contain glass particles, sulfuric acid, and hydrochloric acid--no walking or standing in these toxic clouds.
  • And some folks are enticed onto the new land created by the lava hitting the ocean--called benches--which are very unstable and prone to collapse.

Tourists and Hawaiian residents, observing bursts of gas and flame from the streams of lava, are being arrested for walking on hardened igneous rock and trespassing citations are handed out as people avoid barricades to take pictures, being caught going through areas with toxic gases.

The Phenomenon of Pele's Hair

And if the above list wasn't enough, there are the fine flaxen tresses of Pele. Named for the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes, droplets of cooling lava are stretched up to six feet in the wind and should not be touched as it is actually volcanic fiberglass that can be very sharp and penetrate the skin. Here is a quick video to illustrate this phenomenon:

Fines

Entering certain zones bring a $5000 penalty and a year in jail. These reflect fines and punishments increased recently by the Department of Land and Natural Resources.  

Is there a type of fence that you need to manage or direct pedestrians? Louis Page can assist you in finding just the right fence for your site.

Safety Fence

 

Read More

Topics: wire fence, high tensile wire, vinyl coated wire, vinyl coated, galv after

What Is High Tensile Wire Fence?

June 25, 2013 | by Rick Hoffman

Control Cattle, Sheep, and Other Livestock

Cowboys Riding a Horse Near Gray Wooden Fence Taken during Dayitme

High Tensile wire is regarded as the most significant improvement in farm fencing since the introduction of barbed wire in 1874. While relatively new in the US, it has been used to effectively control cattle, sheep, and other livestock on ranches in other countries for over 50 years. It has now become the preferred choice for agricultural fencing in the USA.
high tensile wire fences

Low carbon wire or high tensile wire

Low carbon wire is made from steel rod with a carbon content of approximately 0.10%. This type of wire is easy to work with and fairly forgiving. However, it is prone to elongation, falling victim to stretching and sagging. And its strength is low when compared to high tensile wire.

High tensile wire is made of higher carbon steel. The carbon content of this wire is approximately 0.28%. This increased carbon content significantly increases the wire’s strength and reduces elongation. This allows the use of a smaller diameter high tensile wire versus a thicker low carbon wire.

High tensile wire fence: So Many Advantages

  • Lower overall costs due to smaller diameter wire and fewer posts used
  • High tensile wire can be installed using fewer fence posts than low carbon fence
  • High tensile: post spacing up to 16.5 feet vs low carbon: post spacing 8 to 10 feet
  • Stronger – about twice the strength as low carbon wire for effectively controlling any type of livestock: horses, hogs, cattle, deer, sheep, goat, etc.
  • Lighter weight means easier handling during installation
  • High tensile fences remain tight for years – even if a tree falls on a high tensile fence, it will spring back to shape once the tree is removed                                                                                                                                                                                             

Plus:

  • Very low maintenance
  • Longer life – 40 plus years if properly maintained
  • Can be easily electrified
  • More secure
  • Looks neater
  • Much safer for livestock than barbed wire
  • Class 3 galvanizing is standard

With high tensile wire build a long-lasting, low maintenance fence for nearly half the price of a conventional low carbon fence.

High Tensile wire fence = high performance and long life!

Download the woven Deer Fence brochure!

 

Rick signature  Rick VP sales Louis E. Page, Inc.      

Read More

Topics: high tensile wire, galvanized

Deer Fence, Blueberries, and Increased Yield - Video

January 21, 2011 | by Duncan Page

Increasing Blueberry Yield

The 8' fence, angled to the outside of the blueberry patch, is easy to build and easy to move. Simple in design, his deer fence uses seven strands of wire. He says it cost him $.40 per foot to build!

Prior to building the fence, the patch typically yielded 3,500 pounds of berries. The season after he built the fence, the yield was up to 14,000 pounds!

Joe Wave of Wave's U-Pick Blueberries in Kaleva, Michigan talks about his innovative deer fence.

                                                             

What do you think of this solution? Would it be something you'd want to use?

Have you seen other deer fences that differ from the 8' tall barriers that are most common?                                                                      

Read More

Topics: high tensile wire, Fencing Tips

High Tensile Wire Fence Breaking Strength - Video

June 3, 2010 | by Duncan Page

 
Lighter, yet Stronger
 
Understanding the breaking strength of high tensile wire fence versus low carbon wire fencing. Bekaert's Steven Sarson illustrates the differences in this very helpful video.

 

Read More

Topics: high tensile wire

Help is always available. Click for a free fence quote.
Click here to shop our online store

Recent Posts

Subscribe to Email Updates