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The Fence Post

Setting Posts for Your Fence

July 15, 2021 | by Joe Morrell

Setting Posts--No Concrete

Mark, Line, and Set. This excellent demonstration shows how to deal with undulating terrain, obstacles, and planning for gates. Tamp it down and forget the concrete! Okay, this moves slowly, but its thorough and makes a heck of a lot of sense. 

 

Farm and Field Fence

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Topics: fencing materials, field fence, high tensile wire, farm fence, deer and orchard fence

Using Llamas for Protection

February 12, 2021 | by Joe Morrell

Llama behind fence

Protecting your Herd

A llama provides an imposing and somewhat foreign presence in the modern farmyard. They have an odd, disarming call that keeps predators at bay and sounds an alarm for your benefit--and for your herd's. In terms of protection, this is reason enough, yet this is only the beginning of their impressive credentials. 

Llamas May Be Your Answer

Ranchers are overwhelmingly positive about keeping llamas, chiefly in economic terms: loss to predation is dramatically reduced, particularly for sheep farmers.

Llamas are naturally suspicious of and aggressive to dogs, foxes, coyotes, and wolves.

They appear threatening, have unique methods of defense, and are able to kill these powerful predators. The best specimens for guarding pastures are gelded males or females that have been bred and become protective. An open, fenced pasture is preferred, as hilly terrain can result in the llamas being separated from the herd, reducing protection. Llamas like to have the long view.

High Alert

You will find that their awareness of potential invaders is acute. They're constantly checking the periphery of your fenced area. Scan through this video and watch just a bit to see how alert a llama is while it surveys the area:

 

Behavior

Llamas make a welcome companion to your herd as they integrate with pasture animals naturally and in many cases simply become one of the herd. They are very tolerant of their field companions, working well with cows, sheep, poultry, and goats. However, in a shared pasture, goats have parasites that can be damaging to llamas, so this must be monitored. They can be attentive to lambs and particularly watchful of newborns. Ranchers generally report that their predation problems are completely or substantially eliminated. It is said by some that two or more llamas will sometimes bond with each other and ignore the sheep but this generally untrue. Llamas are social animals and should have at least one partner of the same sex--two females or two gelded males. 

 

Llamas are not aggressive and are generally docile; often liking to keep a few feet of distance but not threatened by humans. They may spit when provoked. Their spitting is unpleasant, more like a regurgitation, but much more rare than thought, usually reserved for an extreme threat and rarely done to their near and dears--meaning you. Respect their need for distance or they may throw a sideways kick to warn you off. 

A Few Basics

Their coat is not prized like that of an alpaca, yet does need to be sheered once a year. Also, their toenails--two on each foot--need to be trimmed every 2 to 6 months. Bred as guardian animals, they were also bred as pack animals and for pulling; llamas can carry a lot of weight and capable of traveling through rough terrain. And it may be interesting to note that they often choose one area for droppings in a field, and uniquely, these can be transferred straight onto the garden.

They beat guard dogs in these ways: 

  • No barking at night
  • Respectful of fence boundaries and not interested in escape, unlike dogs
  • They eat grass; eating hay when there's no grass--usually whatever the sheep and cows are eating--as opposed to a dog which requires its own separate and costly feeding
  • Vet bills are few compared to a dog
  • They live longer than guard dogs--15 years and up

If You're Serious

Before you buy one, check out online sources and local want ads for free llamas. Due to varying circumstances, there are often free llamas available or some that are rescues. This cattle rancher has used llamas to great benefit:

 

Creating an Enclosure

An excellent choice for your pasture is sheep and goat fence, featuring woven 4" x 4" mesh. Made with 12½ gauge high tensile Class 3 galvanized wire for extra long life and rust resistance. Designed with goats and sheep in mind, this fence will work beautifully with the presence of a llama as it is a strong confinement fence. The 4" x 4" mesh deters sheep and goats from putting their heads through the openings. Vertical and horizontal wires are joined by strong stiff stay knots. These smooth-sided knots will not injure animals and give the fence flexibility, minimizing the potential for injury. This fence will conform to hilly terrain, thanks to deeply crimped horizontal wires. Consider Farm and Field Fence, Deer and Wildlife Fence, and Horse Fence as well, depending on your pasturing needs. Add a llama behind an excellent fence and enjoy the enhanced security for your flock and your peace of mind. 

llama in field

Sheep and Goat Fence

 

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Topics: field fence, fixed knot, deer and wildlife fence, woven wire mesh

How To Install Field Fence On Studded T Posts - Video

July 11, 2019 | by Joe Morrell

The Neighbor's Dogs

This video shows some folks putting up a field fence on studded T posts to keep out some unmanaged dogs and keep peace in the neighborhood.. 

 

Field Fence

Studded T Posts

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Topics: woven wire, field fence, video

Cross Fence

March 22, 2018 | by Debbie Page

cows in pasture during twilight

What's a Cross Fence?

Cross fences are built inside a large fenced-in area dedicated to either grazing livestock or growing forage. These fence lines divide the large area, already enclosed with a perimeter fence, into smaller pastures. A cross fence can be electric, permanent, or a combination of the two. The electric fence, using either one or two strands of wire, is easier and less expensive to build. Less bracing is required.

The Separation of Cattle

A permanent fence, which is usually made with three or four strands of barbed wire, requires bracing to maintain proper tension. The type of fence chosen depends on the livestock it will contain. If the fence needs to separate cattle, a permanent fence is recommended. An electric fence is appropriate for sheep, calves or yearlings.

Brown Cow on Grass Field

Some Basics

Q: What is the purpose of a cross fence?

A: To separate areas contained within a perimeter fence.

Q: When is a cross fence used?

A: Most often in grazing areas for rotating livestock to prevent over-grazing or uneven grazing. 

Q: What are the benefits and advantages of using a cross fence?

A: Protecting paddocks: bald or over-grazed areas can become subject to weeds and noxious plants, while excessive growth in under-grazed areas become less palatable and less nutritious.

Q: What are some other uses?

A: Separating livestock by sex, age, and breeding status or for other reasons. Keeping livestock away from crops or treatment of areas, such as the application of fertilizers.

Here's an excellent demonstration by a very knowledgeable rancher:

 

 Farm and Field Fence

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Topics: fence, field fence, farm fence

Can You Still Buy American Made Fence Material?

June 13, 2013 | by Rick Hoffman

Yes! You can still buy American-made Fencing.

Nowadays, it seems like everything is made in China or some other country. While this may be true for a lot of products, it is not true for all fence products. There are a lot of fence products still made with pride and exceptional quality in the great US of A! In fact, most fence products are still available from domestic manufacturers.

3 photos--American flag, American proud, and eagle

Competitive Pricing, High Performance 

These companies employ hard-working, tax-paying Americans! American-made products are superior in quality and are surprisingly price competitive versus imported products. American-made products provide an overall better value than lesser quality imports because the fence will last many years longer and will not need to be replaced. Just think of the hassle, expense, and inconvenience you will avoid! Just like the old saying “You get what you pay for.”

>You may be aware of “The Buy American Act” which restricts the purchase of supplies that are not domestic end products. For manufactured end products, the Buy American Act uses a two-part test to define a domestic end product.

  1. The product must be manufactured in the United States; and
  2. The cost of domestic components must exceed 50 percent of the cost of all the components.

The Buy American Act applies to all U.S. Federal government agency purchases of goods valued over the micro-purchase threshold but does not apply to services. Under the Act, all goods for public use (articles, materials, or supplies) must be produced in the U.S., and manufactured items must be manufactured in the U.S. from U.S. materials. Many states and municipalities include similar geographic requirements in their procurement legislation.

If quality and supporting America are important to you, please consider buying products made in the USA the next time you need fencing. Sure you may pay a little more, and you may have to dig a little deeper to find products made in the USA since most retailers and discount online sellers primarily sell imported products. But the effort and added costs are well worth it in the long run. Go USA!Made in USA flag

Free catalog!

Rick signature Rick VP sales Louis E. Page, Inc.

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Topics: field fence, GAW, GBW, vinyl coated

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