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The Fence Post

Snow Fences

January 6, 2020 | by Joe Morrell

Snowy road to farmhouse with trees

Drifting snow is a safety hazard for passing cars or airplanes taking off and landing.

Blowing Snow:

  • Blinds drivers and reduces visibility
  • Causes accidents through lack of vehicle control
  • Complicates road maintenance

Snow Drifts:

  • reduce distance visibility, especially at intersections and around curving roadway
  • enable build-up of ice on roadways
  • bury signage and reduce effectiveness of guard rails and safety barriers

Melting snow and its seepage runs under the pavement, causing cracking and heaving of roadways.

When installed correctly, wooden snow fencing can create a desired barrier for accumulating snow, saving you time and money with snow removal and property damage. Wooden snow fencing is the traditional choice for preventing snow from drifting onto roads, highways, and airport runways. Thereby build-up of snow, slush and ice are reduced, as well as runoff which impairs drainage. Our top quality, made in America, snow fence is constructed from vertical running aspen and spruce wood lath woven together with 13-gauge galvanized wire. Installing these fences along roads and runways increase the efficiency of snow removal and allows for a safer, uninterrupted travel. The sturdy construction of this natural snow fence makes it an aesthetic, durable, and economical alternative to plastic snow fence. Traditional wooden snow fencing has many alternative uses.

Our wooden snow fence is: 

  • made with No.1 Aspen or Spruce pickets (3/8” x 1 ½” x 48”.)
  • woven with 5 double-strands of 13 gauge galvanized wire.
  • painted with red iron oxide stain.
  • sold in 50-foot rolls.

Snow fences save lives and drastically reduce maintenance costs.

How Does Snow Fencing Work?

The way snow fencing works is a fairly simple concept. A properly constructed fence will cause snow to drift down wind of it. When the wind blows over the fence, it causes an eddy or swirl to form behind the fence. This in turn causes a rolling wind current that flows downward and to the back side of the fence. As a result of this air current, a drift of snow forms in front of the fence on the windward side. A well designed fence can retain the snow to a place of your desiring as well as preventing snow from drifting to unwanted areas.

snow fence in deep snow drift

Important Planning is Required

Determining wind direction and resulting effects on vegetation, drift development and features, observation of wind-affected trees, abraded wooden poles or fencing, and sourcing local meteorological data should all be considered in the placement of a snow fence.

Uses for Snow Fencing

  • Airport Runways
  • Compost Piles / Compost Storage
  • Construction Site Boundary
  • Crowd Control
  • Cribbing
  • Dog and Pet Safety
  • Garden Center and Nursery Benching, Operations
  • Golf Course Maintenance
  • Livestock Control and Shading
  • Packaging and Crating
  • Road Maintenance
  • Sand Dune Maintenance

Posts

  • Steel T-posts: made of hot rolled rail steel and formed into a “T”
  • Dimensions: 1 7/16” X 1 5/16” x 1/8” x 6’ (six feet) long
  • Weight of post section without anchor is 1.25 pounds per foot.
  • Area of anchor plates 23 square inches.
  • The post comes in painted green, or galvanized.

Snow Fence

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Topics: snow fence, steel fence posts

T Post Installation

May 8, 2019 | by Joe Morrell

Using T Posts

                                                                             First, a lesson in T post installation


T Post Efficiency 

No digging holes for wooden posts--a huge benefit of T posts is their installation. Pounded right into the ground, most easily done with a post hole driver. Straight and strong, knock em in, and revel in their ability to hold.  And happily, they can be moved, too. Permanent or temporary, you choose. 

T Post Strength

These American made posts are made of 100% recycled rail steel. Think about what freight trains pull. This is that steel. Very tough, durable, and able to bear a generous load. They're a fine choice for hard or rocky ground and can even stand up to livestock.

T Post Economy

Wood or vinyl posts carry a hefty price tag. T posts are a bargain in comparison. Add their ease of installation and longevity, you end up saving considerable time and money. And you can cover a lot of ground. Louis Page also includes five wire fasteners with each post.

Three surface treatments:

  • coated with baked enamel
  • hot-dipped galvanization
  • untreated

Consider purchasing T posts that are galvanized for longer life. Particularly in coastal climates where there is more risk of increased corrosion of steel which is vulnerable to rust. Yet even unfinished T posts are very weather resistant due to the high quality of rail steel.  

Are you thinking that wood might be more appealing? Aesthetics are important; however, T posts are seen mostly in winter whereas in summer the posts are covered in leafy vines. Even treated wood posts are vulnerable to rot, breakage, and taking a beating from the weather. However, if a T post is for some reason damaged, it is easily replaced.

Use them for silt fencing, snow fencing and safety fencing.

Here's an example of T posts holding up grapevines.
Vineyard T Posts

 You can also these beauties for sign posts, pens, guide stakes, home gardens, and more.

Shop T Posts

 

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Topics: galvanized after, posts, steel fence posts, steel fence posts and driver

Studded T Posts: What You Need to Know

July 8, 2016 | by Debbie Page

A Lasting Fence 

When you build a wire fence, the type of wire you use is very important. Using an inferior wire will lead the fence to rust quickly and need to be replaced. Instead, you should use vinyl coated, stainless steel, zinc aluminum with black paint (if available), or Class 3 galvanized (if available), which will stand up to the elements and last much longer. However, just as important as the type of wire you use are the type of posts that hold the wire up. These are often overlooked when it comes to fence building, but if you use the wrong type, it can weaken the structural integrity of your fence even faster than the wrong wire. That’s why it’s important, when building a Class 3 galvanized wire fence, to use galvanized posts as well.

galvanized T post
Various Finishes
  • Galvanized: To galvanize something is to coat it in a protective layer of zinc. Zinc will stand up against water and the elements better than other types of metals, protecting against rust and making your metal last longer. Galvanization takes place either before (GBW) or after (GAW) the welding. GAW is the longest lasting of those two. Class 3 galvanized wire (if available). Class 1 galvanization uses only a very thin layer of zinc, which lasts 2 - 11 years before it rusts. In a coastal area, where salt water is a factor, it can last 2 years or less. Class 3 galvanization, on the other hand, is thicker and can last anywhere from 13 to 30 years. It’s a little more expensive, but it doesn’t have to be replaced nearly as often, saving you more money in the long run.
  • Stainless Steel: Stainless steel welded wire mesh is strong and long-lasting. By its very nature, stainless steel wire needs no additional finish, such as galvanizing or PVC, to protect it. The wire itself is extremely resistant to rust, corrosion, and harsh chemicals. If you need a welded mesh or fence in an area with prolonged exposure to corrosives, stainless steel products will meet the demands. Type 316 is recommended for saltwater environments since it has a higher resistance to corrosion than Type 304.
  • Vinyl Coated - VC: Welded wire fencing and meshes are both long lasting and attractive. Galvanized welded mesh is coated with a thick layer of PVC which is tightly bonded to the wire by a heat process. The coating is flexible and will not crack when the wire is bent. It is stable over a wide temperature range, maintaining its qualities in extremes of both hot and cold temperatures. UV inhibitors are in the vinyl to retard degradation from sunlight. The coating is also very resistant to scraping and abrasion. Vinyl coated welded wire mesh and fence sometimes referred to as plastic coated wire products, are very strong and durable. They are long lasting and rust resistant. They have double protection. Not only does the vinyl coating seal the wire from water and other corrosive elements, but the underlying mesh is also protected by a zinc coating.
  • Zinc Aluminum - ZA: A new, zinc-coated aluminum hybrid coating. It lasts more than twice as long as Class 1 but uses less coating then Class 3, which saves you money.
  • ZA with Black paint: Lasts more than twice as long as Class 3 and is painted black. It will last 13 to 30 until rust in non-coastal environments.

The Benefits of Steel Posts
The wire isn’t the only part of your fence that’s subject to the elements. The posts are as well. You can have the best wire on the market, but if the posts fail first, you’ll still have to replace your fence sooner than intended. A lot of wire fences use wood posts. They’re strong and sturdy, but they can rot over time, or be eaten away by termites and other bugs. It’s much better to use metal posts. The best posts are the steel T-posts because they are galvanized. They are made with studs every 2 1/8" down the length of the post, allowing you to customize the height of your fence easily and prevent the fence from riding up and down the post.

Galvanization is a plus--

Of course, metal posts are subject to the same issues as metal wires are. If you’re not careful, they can rust. Therefore, just as it’s important to use the choices mentioned above for your fence, it’s also essential to use galvanized posts. Galvanization will guard your posts against the elements so that they don’t rust as quickly.

Your posts are what hold your fence together, so it’s important that they be strong, sturdy, and long-lasting. A high-quality wire on a cheap, low-quality post will cause problems and likely need to be replaced within a few years. But if you use strong, metal, galvanized posts, with top quality wire, then your wire fence can last you for decades.

Download the T Post brochure!

Bird on T post

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Topics: galvanized, posts, vinyl coated, steel fence posts

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