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The Fence Post

Galvanized Before vs Galvanized After Mesh & Fence

January 20, 2009 | by Duncan Page

 
What is the difference between Galvanized Before and Galvanized After welded and woven wire mesh and fence?
 
Galvanized Before Weld  (or weave)                                                         


GBW
 fence and mesh are made from strands of galvanized wire. The wires used can be any gauge. After being drawn down to the final diameter, the wire is galvanized - coated with zinc. The wires are then welded or woven together. During the welding process the protective layer of zinc is burnt off. This leaves the wire unprotected at the welded joint where the wires cross. When the wires are woven, the galvanizing is not affected. However in the meshes that are tightly woven with several twists, such as hex netting chicken wire fence, the woven area where the wires intersect is a vulnerable area.

When GBW meshes and fencing are used outside and exposed to the elements, rain or any corrosive liquid will collect at these vulnerable spots. Rust and corrosion will start to eat at the wire, weakening the mesh and fence, limiting its lifetime. There is a wide variety of mesh opening sizes made. Some fences with the same openings are available in a variety of gauges.

GBW fences and mesh features -

  • economical
  • limited lifetime, unless used inside or in other protected locations
  • heavier gauge outlasts lighter gauge - 12-1/2 gauge lasts longer than 14 gauge
  • available in a wide variety of gauge and mesh combinations
  • temporary fence
  • concrete reinforcement
  • indoor storage area partitions                                                                                                                                

Galvanized After Weld (or weave)

GAW mesh and fencing will last a long time. After the wires are either welded or woven into a mesh, the entire finished product is drawn through a bath of molten zinc. The GAW mesh emerges with a thick coating tightly bonded to the wire. Each strand of wire is protected. More importantly, each vulnerable welded or woven area is thoroughly sealed.

GAW fences and mesh are ideal for use in any area where exposure to water and other corrosive substances will be expected. The extra zinc of the galvanized after mesh and fence guarantees a longer lifetime than galvanized before products. Meshes and fence are more costly than galvanized before. GAW specifications are available in a wide selection of gauges and mesh opening sizes.

GAW fences and mesh features -

  • long lifetime - resistant to rust and corrosion                                                                                                         
  • wires and welded or woven spots are thoroughly galvanized                                                                              
  • available in different gauges and mesh sizes                                                                                                         
  • salt water use                                                                                                                                                             
  • small animal cages                                                                                                                                                      
  • greenhouse benches                                                                                                                                                  
  • in-ground wire for groundhog barriers and bird pens

 

 

Topics: galvanized after, GAW, galvanized before, GBW

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