Call us: 800.225.0508 | E-mail: sales@louispage.com

The Fence Post

Everything You Need to Know About Welded Wire Mesh Fence Panels

July 28, 2016 | by Cheryl Vergilis

Need to build a deck on your home, an animal enclosure, a boardwalk, or aquaculture related traps? Please consider welded wire mesh panels. Welded wire mesh panels come in a variety of mesh configurations, gauges, and finishes. Many zoos use welded wire fence panels for their animal enclosures. Depending on the animal, a lighter or heavier gauge wire may be utilized. For decking purposes, you may choose a vinyl coated welded wire panel, or stainless steel may be an option. Nurseries use PVC (polyvinyl chloride) coated panels for greenhouse benches as well as aquaculture for the marine industry. There are many applications for welded wire mesh panels which may be suitable to your needs.
Louis Page Fence Panel
Panels fabricated from previously manufactured rolls of wire are flattened and cut or sheared to size. As mentioned, welded wire mesh panels are offered in a variety of gauges (usually from 8g to 16g) depending on how strong the requirement or specification. Unlike a chain link fence, welded wire mesh panels can be offered to the measurements needed. Some wire mesh panels offered through Louis E. Page are custom fabricated and made-to-order, depending on the configuration and specifications. The vinyl coated welded wire mesh panels are coated with, as are the rolls of wire, weather resistant material, including UV.

Panels versus Roles

A quick note about the difference between panels and rolls. Panels are easy to install, especially when remodeling a deck on your home. They are custom made to your specifications, need minimal to no cutting and can typically be installed by one to two people. All these attributes make panels ideal for quick installs with minimal work crews.

Wire fence rolls are perfect for jobs that have larger linear footage to cover which may require work crews and professional installers. There are also additional materials like posts, rings, pliers and everything else you need to install a fence. We have many different customers who use the wire mesh rolls for multi purposes like farming/agriculture, fencing, nurseries, and the likes.

We offer many different varieties of wire rolls and panels, and we recommend discussing your projects with us. We have the knowledge to provide the perfect solution!!

Welded Wire Mesh Panel Install Tips

If the panels are going to be installed onto a wooden frame, stapling the mesh to one side of the wood helps keep it in place. It is recommended to staple it every few inches to keep it secure. The welded wire does not stretch like woven chain link fencing. Therefore, the panel size needs to be accurate when ordering. It is best to use galvanized staples for weather resistance.

Tension

Depending on the wire gauge and the mesh opening of a panel, there may be a bow which may cause sagging. If this occurs and stapling isn't an option, a strand wire can be woven through the meshes to keep it upright and straight. The strand wire can be secured to a post and twisted as needed. Wire gauges and mesh openings play a significant role when determining what is best for an application.

T-Posts

It is important to understand that not all posts are the same. Steel t-posts and u-posts are offered as a solution when installing panels, as well as rolls of wire fencing. It is recommended using a post that is 2' (feet) longer or taller than the height of the finished fence height. For instance, if the height is going to be 5' tall, then 7' posts would be quite sufficient. You can use 6' posts, but over time may become loose or unstable in the ground.

Animals

If you plan to enclose animals, please keep in mind that animals do grow and can outgrow their environment. Make sure the height of the panels or fence are large enough to keep them safe and to keep wild animals out. Also, consider the overall size of the enclosure carefully. The mesh openings and gauges play a significant role when making these decisions. Animals may have to walk on the wire so a smaller mesh opening would be more comfortable on their feet, but the sides of the cage/enclosure could have larger mesh openings to see in/out. 

Shop Fence Panels

Read More

Why You Should Use Steel Posts with Wire Fences

July 8, 2016 | by Debbie Page

When you build a wire fence, the type of wire you use is very important. Using an inferior wire will lead the fence to rust quickly and need to be replaced. Instead, you should use vinyl coated, stainless steel, Zinc Aluminum with black paint (if available), or Class 3 galvanized (if available), which will stand up to the elements and last longer. However, just as important as the type of wire you use is the type of posts that hold the wire up. These are often overlooked when it comes to fence building, but if you use the wrong type, it can weaken the structural integrity of your fence even faster than the wrong wire. That’s why it’s important, when building a Class 3 galvanized wire fence, to use galvanized posts as well.

t_post_galv_-_pic_left-1.jpg
Finishes

  • Galvanized: To galvanize something is to coat it in a protective layer of zinc. Zinc will stand up against water and the elements better than other types of metals, protecting against rust and making your metal last longer. Galvanization takes place either before (GBW) or after (GAW) the welding. GAW is the longer lasting of those two. Class 3 galvanized wire (if available). Class 1 galvanization uses only a very thin layer of zinc, which lasts 2 - 11 years before it rusts. In a coastal area, where salt water is a factor, it can last 2 years or less. Class 3 galvanization, on the other hand, is thicker, and can last anywhere from 13 to 30 years. It’s a little more expensive, but it doesn’t have to be replaced nearly as often, saving you more money in the long run.
  • Stainless Steel: Stainless steel welded wire mesh is strong and long lasting. By its very nature stainless steel wire needs no additional finish, such as galvanizing or PVC, to protect it. The wire itself is extremely resistant to rust, corrosion and harsh chemicals. If you need a welded mesh or fence in an area with prolonged exposure to corrosives, stainless steel products will meet the demands. Type 316 is recommended for salt water environments since it has a higher resistance to corrosion than Type 304.
  • Vinyl Coated - VC - welded wire fencing and meshes are both long lasting and attractive. Galvanized welded mesh is coated with a thick layer of PVC which is tightly bonded to the wire by a heat process. The coating is flexible and will not crack when the wire is bent. It is stable over a wide temperature range, maintaining its qualities in extremes of both hot and cold temperatures. UV inhibitors are in the vinyl to retard degradation from sunlight. The coating is also very resistant to scraping and abrasion. Vinyl coated welded wire mesh and fence, sometimes referred to as plastic coated wire products, are very strong and durable. They are long lasting and rust resistant. They have double protection. Not only does the vinyl coating seal the wire from water and other corrosive elements, but the underlying mesh is also protected by a zinc coating.
  • Zinc Aluminum - ZA: a new, zinc-coated aluminum hybrid coating. It lasts more than twice as long as Class 1, but uses less coating then Class 3, which saves you money.
  • ZA with Black paint: Lasts more than twice as long as Class 3 and is painted black. It will last 13 to 30 until rust in non-coastal environments.


Benefits of Steel Posts

The wire isn’t the only part of your fence that’s subject to the elements. The posts are as well. You can have the best wire on the market, but if the posts fail first, you’ll still have to replace your fence sooner than intended. A lot of wire fences use wood posts. They’re strong and sturdy, but they can rot over time, or be eaten away by termites and other bugs. It’s much better to use metal posts. The best posts are the steel T-posts because they are galvanized. They are made with studs every 2 1/8" down the length of the post, allowing you to customize the height of your fence easily and prevent the fence from riding up and down the post.

But of course, metal posts are subject to the same issues as metal wires are. If you’re not careful, they can rust. Therefore, just as it’s important to use the choices mentioned above for your fence, it’s also essential to use galvanized posts. Galvanization will guard your posts against the elements, so that they don’t rust as quickly.

Your posts are what hold your fence together, so it’s important that they be strong, sturdy, and long-lasting. High quality wire on a cheap, low quality post will cause problems and likely need to be replaced within a few years. But if you use strong, metal, galvanized posts, with top quality wire, then your wire fence can last you for decades.

Download the T Post brochure!

Read More

Topics: how to, fence choices

What Zoos Need to Do to Make Sure Their Structures Are Child Proof?

June 30, 2016 | by Debbie Page

It was an incident that shocked the entire world, with both animal lovers and parents everywhere flabbergasted by the outcome of something that could have been easily prevented. The Cincinnati gorilla killing occurred on May 28, when a 3-year-old child managed to climb into an herbivorous ape’s enclosure at Cincinnati Zoo, overlooked by the eyes of his mother. Despite her negligence in failing to monitor her son’s behavior, the mother was not charged and instead, Harambe the gorilla was shot dead. To add an even bigger element of shock to the tragedy, footage released after his death exhibited the ape’s protective behavior towards the young boy.

 

Gorilla_and_Fence.jpg

Following the death of 450-pound Harambe, who had celebrated his 17th birthday just the day before he was shot dead, investigations were demanded by animal rights groups, including Stop Animal Exploitation Now. Aside from the animal’s unfair end to life and the mother’s failure to know her son’s whereabouts, zoos everywhere are now wondering just how they can prevent future disasters such as this. So, what is the answer? To make sure structures are completely child-proof.


Here are some ideas zoos may want to consider to ensure the health and safety of visitors at your wildlife park or zoological garden:

    • Fences – There are so many fence designs and styles to choose from for safety purposes, including class 1 galvanized fences that are coated with a layer of zinc and class 3 galvanized, which are stronger due to their thicker coating. Heavy duty fences and vinyl coated fences will also do the trick.
    • Hardware – Once fences have been installed, they can be strengthened with hardware in the form of earth anchors and ground staples. Consider this if the animals in your zoo are of a heavy weight or possess good climbing capability.
    • Mesh and Netting – The options really are endless when it comes to selecting mesh and netting. For superior safety and rust resistance, hexagonal wire netting will be a worthwhile investment, whereas lightweight sparrow netting will work best for zoo enclosures with small animals, such as birds. Keep in mind that mesh can also be used to reinforce concrete structures.
    • Welded Wire – Stainless steel, vinyl coated, galvanized before (GBW), galvanized after (GAW) – the choice really is yours. Used widely for the containment of large animals, welded wire offers security that is impenetrable, making it ideal for childproofing purposes.

Being a zoo owner/supporter means that you are responsible for ensuring that both adults and young ones are safe in their surroundings. Making a decision about which child proof structure would be best for your zoo depends on what animals you house in your enclosures. For example, tall structures should be strategically placed to prevent children from being able to climb over the obstruction. Chain link mesh barriers would be best suited to keep smaller animals in their designated territory, as would net enclosures. Speaking to a professional who can provide you with bespoke solutions will guarantee that your structures are child proof for the long haul.

Read More

5 Types of Coatings for Wire Fences

June 24, 2016 | by Debbie Page


You’re all set to install a wire fence on your property. But what kind of coating will you use on the fencing material? It’s a question a lot of beginners don’t consider, but it’s an important one. The wire coating you use on your fence determines a number of factors, including how long it will last and how it will handle itself against the elements. So what are your options? Here are the basic types of wire coating for fences.

 

Vinyl Coated Fence

 

  • Class 1 Galvanized – This is the most basic type of coating, used on barbed wire and field fences. The wire is galvanized, by adding a thin, protective layer of zinc. It’s cheap and efficient, but unfortunately not as effective as other types of coating in the long term. Class 1 Galvanized wire fences start to rust quickly. They’ll last a maximum of 11 years, and sometimes as little as 2 years. In a coastal area, where there’s salt water in the air, it can last an even shorter time.
  • Class 3 Galvanized – This is a stronger, longer-lasting zinc coating. Whereas Class 1 wire coating uses 0.28 ounces of zinc per square foot, Class 3 uses a thicker coating of 0.80 ounces per square foot. It costs slightly more than Class 1, but it will last anywhere from 13 to 30 years before it rusts, making it well worth the investment.
  • ZA – A relatively new development, ZA is a Zinc-Aluminum hybrid coating. It uses less coating than Class 3, making it cheaper, but the aluminum prevents rust, so that it still lasts about the same amount of time. The result is a less expensive wire fence that will still last you up to 30 years before it rusts.
  • ZA and Paint – Paint on a fence does more than simply make it look more attractive. After galvanizing the wire with the Zinc-Aluminum coating, it’s painted with black polymer paint, which offers even heavier protection against rust and corrosion. It lasts
    even longer than a Class 3 Galvanized fence and protects against the harshest elements.
  • Vinyl – Also called PVC or uPVC coating, vinyl is the strongest wire coating of all when it comes to standing up against the elements. A thick, flexible PVC layer is added to the galvanized wire. That way, not only is it rust resistant, it also stands up to extreme temperatures, as well as UV rays and even physical abrasions against the fence. Plus, its flexibility means it won’t crack when the wire is bent. Generally available in either black or green, vinyl is the strongest, most durable, longest lasting wire coating you can buy.

     

    So which wire coating is best for your fence? It depends on what you need and where you’re located. If your main goal is cutting costs, and the fence only needs to be temporary, then you can probably get away with Class 1 galvanized wire. If you’re looking for something a little stronger, that will last longer and save you money in the long run, go with Class 3 or ZA. If you really want your fence to last a long time, then ZA and Paint is the way to go. And if you live in a coastal area, or one with other harsh elements, and want a reliable, long-lasting wire fence, then you’ll want to go with vinyl coating. Consider your needs and your options carefully. A well-built wire fence with the right coating can last you a lifetime.

     

     

    Download the VC welded wire brochure!  



 

Read More

Topics: Wire Coating

How to Repair Your Broken Fence

April 13, 2016 | by Debbie Page

Spring is here and it’s time to prepare your fence for the warmer months. Winter can be tough on fences. Trees fall down. Branches take out fence sections. The land freezes and defrosts, making your fence unstable. By the time spring rolls around, your fence can end up rusty, misshapen or even on the ground.

Inspect Your Fence

Now is the time to inspect your fence. To begin an inspection, walk the perimeter of the fence and inspect it from bottom to top. You will want to pay special attention to where the fence meets the ground. Have any animals burrowed underneath your fence?

Plus you will want to make sure there is no rust. Fences that are constantly touching the ground tend to rust at a higher rate. Over time, you may notice that an entire section has rusted away at ground level.

Inspection should also involve shaking the fence. Is it securely in the ground? Have any of the fence posts become damaged or loose in the ground. If your fence is coated in vinyl, check to see if the vinyl is peeling.

In addition to making any notes for yourself about damage, rust or peeling, you will want to pull off any vegetation that may have grown on your fence. Although some people find ivy and other plants appealing when it is growing on fences, vegetation speeds up the decay of your fence.

Common things to note during your fence inspection include:

  • Lack of sturdiness
  • Fence post stability
  • Weld strength
  • Rust
  • Vinyl peeling
  • Vegetation
  • Holes under the fence

You will want to fix or address any and all of the items on this list in preparation for warmer months.

broken-fence.png

APRIL SAVINGS OFFER: Spend $200 or more in April and get 5% off your order (excluding shipping costs) Call 1-800-225-0508 or emailing sales@louispage.com

Common types of fence damage and how to fix them:

Rust

Rust is the number one enemy of metal fences. Once rust sets in, you can never restore your fence 100% but you can maintain it for a long life. To repair your fence from rusting:

  1. Brush off rust with a steel brush.
  2. Spray area with your favorite metal protective spray paint/coating.
  3. Monitor fence area for any additional rust.

Peeling Vinyl Coating

Vinyl coating helps to prolong the life of your fence but over time the vinyl starts to peel. To maintain a vinyl coated fence:

  1. Trim away excessive peeling vinyl.
  2. Use 60 grit sandpaper to sand away the small piece and create a smooth finish.
  3. Spray area with your favorite metal protective spray paint/coating.
  4. Monitor fence area for any additional peeling and rust.

Fence Section Demolished by Fallen Tree/Tree Branch

Winter can be tough on trees and anything around your fence that can fall on it and damage the fence. To address a section of fence that has been destroyed we recommend:

  1. Replacing the section with a panel of the same or a similar type of fencing.
  2. Using strand wire to thread together the broken sections.
  3. Replacing or upgrading the fence.

Create A Fence Maintenance Supply List

We also recommend creating a fence maintenance supply list when you are first building a fence and annually. For the supply list we recommend:

  1. Strand wire, fence staples and hog rings.
  2. Purchasing an extra 20% of fence so you can some on hand for repairs.
  3. Reviewing warranties.
  4. Including all your fencing needs in one order.

Louis E. Page is your single source for all your wire mesh requirements. We have strand wire, fence staples, hog rings and more in our catalogue. It is up to you as to how many supplies you want to keep on hand to maintain a strong, sturdy fence. Some of our suppliers offer warranties, for example, Cavatorta, has an excellent product warranty.

At Louis E. Page, we pride ourselves on our customer service and being able to meet your needs. Including all your fencing needs in one order can save you time and ensure you have everything you need when you need it. For example, you might already know that you need welded wire mesh for your animals but what about the crops you plan on planting?

Your plants need support and we have Hortonova - Crop Support Netting. This netting is rot and rust proof, resistant to UV rays and chemical agents. It is ideal for vertical and horizontal growing techniques. You can keep your animals where you want them, plus easily cultivate plants when you combine your ordering needs.

Place an order today by calling 1-800-225-0508 or emailing sales@louispage.com.

Download our Catalogue >

Read More

Topics: fence, repair

Subscribe to Email Updates

Request a Quote
Download your free fence and mesh guide!